New Village chosen for water source, filtration and school projects

I am always behind the 8 ball these days – partly due to the poor internet service I have here, partly because I always seem to be busy (which is a good thing) and partly sheer procrastination….

Art Quickenton, a good friend of Mike and myself, just left a couple of days ago after spending three weeks with us.  A good part of his mission was to select a location to build a new school, with the help of students and faculty at Appalachian University in Boone, North Carolina. There were three good options that were selected to review however as it turned out one of them was not so good afterall.  The trek to the village would have been 5 hours each way (not including the minivan and boat trip) so I cancelled the visit there – the costs would have been just too high to ship materials there and it is very tough to raise money for schools back at home for schools.  So we looked at Ban Phone Kham and Ban Katang Xieng Village.

The choice was clear from the moment we saw the village.  This village has no water and the villagers need to trek to get it with buckets or bottles in hand.  There was no electricity, no toilets of course and the school basically (very basic) consisted of two shacks that do not look like they are going to make it past the next monsoon season.  All of the huts were approximately the same size (my best guess is 10′ x 12′) and all made of bamboo including the roofs – not a single tile roof in the village which was a first for us to see.  Finally, this was the village that had the highest number of kids running around without clothes.  I am making the assumption that water to wash clothes is difficult to get.  Take a look.

Nestled on a mountain top at the  end of a newly finished road.

Nestled on a mountain top at the end of a newly finished road.

I can only imagine building my house here, except with no water or electricity.

I can only imagine building my house here, except with no water or electricity.

With all the comforts of school at home...NOT!

With all the comforts of school at home…NOT!

Nice Blackboards! With only 2 makeshift classrooms, they teach Primary school 1-5.  66 students in total with 25 new students coming in next year.

Nice Blackboards! With only 2 makeshift classrooms, they teach Primary school 1-5. 66 students in total with 25 new students coming in next year.

I wish we could have stayed longer but the sun had just set as we arrived and the mountain road was dangerous at night.

I wish we could have stayed longer but the sun had just set as we arrived and the mountain road was dangerous at night.

Siphan and I were running around to meet with the chief - I wish I had time to get more pictures, especially of the kids - no foreigner had been there before offering assistance so I think we made their day.

Siphan and I were running around to meet with the chief – I wish I had time to get more pictures, especially of the kids – no foreigner had been there before offering assistance so I think we made their day.

The village was 100% Khmu and we couldn’t help but feel for their struggles.  They had visited the officials in Nong Khiaw a number of times to try to get water to their village but so far there has just been one delay after another.  I am hoping that our offer to help will help push the hygiene office into engineering a solution for us.  Meanwhile, Art will be doing a number of fundraisers in Boone to raise funds to build a real school.  We certainly wish Art the best of luck in his endeavors…Thank You Art for your visit and for caring.

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2 thoughts on “New Village chosen for water source, filtration and school projects

  1. Steve, i was much moved by the latest update on the villages with no water or electricity. I am visiting Laos in June, yes I know its not a good time but the airfare was really cheap, and sometimes you just have to go.
    I also need to resupply the handicrafts for my market stall, so a trip was inevitable this year!
    Is there a way to visit either village and take books and pencils? When I visit Laos I bring childrens clothes and give to head man or principle of a school, would either of these help? If I don`t hear back I`ll make different arrangements.
    Thanks for the updates and your continuing enthusiasm, all the best,
    Patricia Ryan Australia

    • Certainly there is a way to visit these villages – wish I could take you there myself but fundraising season will be in full gear by that time. I will send you a direct email with more information. Schools supplies, clothes are all needed but it might be cheaper to buy over there and it supports their local economy. Thanks so much for your interest.

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